thegrumpystudent:

The Study Schedule: A Tip I Thought Wouldn’t Work, but Actually Did
I’m going to be completely honest here when I say that For the longest time, I thought Study Schedules were useless. I thought they were only creating an illusion of getting stuff done and being productive, when in reality, the minute they were created, they were put somewhere and forgotten about. I also thought that it was kinda dumb to box up your life with rigid times when you can’t actually plan out your life, and things can get in the way, mess up your study schedule, and end up leaving you unmotivated.  
But I also noticed recently that I don’t really study my subjects evenly, and the subjects that I think are really important are the ones I put all my energy in and the not-so-important ones just get neglected. So I decided to try out a study schedule for a week, to see if it might help and I can’t believe I haven’t tried this early. It’s easy, keeps me on track and I can make sure I get everything done. So here are my tips for a study schedule!

Note: Before I begin, I just want to say that I made the study schedule above, but the pictures aren’t mine (including the border). 
Let’s Begin~~~!
1.  Flexibility
If you look in the picture, you can see that I didn’t block up specific times that I would do my work. If you decide that from 10am-12:00pm, you were going to study, but you end up having to pick up a friend or buy something last minute, you’ll miss that time and you can feel unmotivated. That’s why, instead of specifying a time, block out hours. On Monday, you might set aside 2 hours for Math, and so you have all of Monday to get it done instead of a specific time period. You can even break it up further, meaning you could do an hour after breakfast and an hour after lunch. The key thing here, is flexibility. 
2. Be free to Prioritise
I’m sure that when many of you know you have a test coming up, you focus on the subject you have the test on, so you know all your stuff in time. That’s hard to do when you have one single timetable that you use all year round. If you have a test the next day for Biology, but your timetable says you should be doing Physics for two hours, you won’t be keeping to your timetable. Some of you might not think its a big deal, but motivation is hard to find and sticking to a study timetable can actually help a lot of people stay on track. Instead, write out weekly schedules. I wrote mine out today, and it took me about 15 minutes over morning coffee. You can see that the subjects I’m studying that have a lot of hours means I have a test coming up, and the subjects I spend less time in don’t have anything important due. 
3. Factor in ‘You!’
Your other commitments have to be counted when making a successful study timetable. If you have work some nights and don’t get home till late, don’t give yourself so much work on those days. I like piling on the work during the weekend, because even if I have a party or I’m going out with friends, there’s more time to focus on all my work as opposed to Wednesday’s when I have work till late. If you’ve got a full day with friends planned for Saturday’s, give yourself the bare minimum to do on that day and make it up another day. 
4. Timing
Block up your time periods whatever way suits you. I personally like to study big blocks of work at a time and since I know that’s what works for me, that’s what I do. If you’re more of a 20 minute studier, block your time into 20 minute increments. Don’t follow generic advice about setting aside an hour for each subject if that’s not how you work. 
5. Breaks
I personally, don’t like pencilling in breaks. If I’m tired, then I’m tired and I need to step back and I again, I don’t like being restricted to when I rest for a bit or not. I’ve blocked out my breaks before, and I remember stopping fifteen minutes before my study time was over because ” my break was in 15 minutes anyway.” If it helps you feel motivated and gives you something to work too, that’s fine, but I really recommend that you don’t set aside specific breaks because you’ll only end up finishing early and forcing yourself to study, as opposed to actually wanting to. If you’re forcing yourself to study, none of the information is going to really stick. 
6. Break it up
Mentioned this before, but breaking it up is really important. I know that my 9 hour Saturday study session seems ridiculous, but a 4 hour study session is about normal for me, so I break the 9hrs into two sessions. I do 4 hours before lunch, 4 hours after lunch, take a good few hours of break and then do the last hour just before bed. You’ll actually get everything done, but you won’t feel chained to your desk all the time. 

So these are my tips for keeping a study schedule. I hope I helped!

thegrumpystudent:

The Study Schedule: A Tip I Thought Wouldn’t Work, but Actually Did

I’m going to be completely honest here when I say that For the longest time, I thought Study Schedules were useless. I thought they were only creating an illusion of getting stuff done and being productive, when in reality, the minute they were created, they were put somewhere and forgotten about. I also thought that it was kinda dumb to box up your life with rigid times when you can’t actually plan out your life, and things can get in the way, mess up your study schedule, and end up leaving you unmotivated.  

But I also noticed recently that I don’t really study my subjects evenly, and the subjects that I think are really important are the ones I put all my energy in and the not-so-important ones just get neglected. So I decided to try out a study schedule for a week, to see if it might help and I can’t believe I haven’t tried this early. It’s easy, keeps me on track and I can make sure I get everything done. So here are my tips for a study schedule!

Note: Before I begin, I just want to say that I made the study schedule above, but the pictures aren’t mine (including the border). 

Let’s Begin~~~!

1.  Flexibility

If you look in the picture, you can see that I didn’t block up specific times that I would do my work. If you decide that from 10am-12:00pm, you were going to study, but you end up having to pick up a friend or buy something last minute, you’ll miss that time and you can feel unmotivated. That’s why, instead of specifying a time, block out hours. On Monday, you might set aside 2 hours for Math, and so you have all of Monday to get it done instead of a specific time period. You can even break it up further, meaning you could do an hour after breakfast and an hour after lunch. The key thing here, is flexibility. 

2. Be free to Prioritise

I’m sure that when many of you know you have a test coming up, you focus on the subject you have the test on, so you know all your stuff in time. That’s hard to do when you have one single timetable that you use all year round. If you have a test the next day for Biology, but your timetable says you should be doing Physics for two hours, you won’t be keeping to your timetable. Some of you might not think its a big deal, but motivation is hard to find and sticking to a study timetable can actually help a lot of people stay on track. Instead, write out weekly schedules. I wrote mine out today, and it took me about 15 minutes over morning coffee. You can see that the subjects I’m studying that have a lot of hours means I have a test coming up, and the subjects I spend less time in don’t have anything important due. 

3. Factor in ‘You!’

Your other commitments have to be counted when making a successful study timetable. If you have work some nights and don’t get home till late, don’t give yourself so much work on those days. I like piling on the work during the weekend, because even if I have a party or I’m going out with friends, there’s more time to focus on all my work as opposed to Wednesday’s when I have work till late. If you’ve got a full day with friends planned for Saturday’s, give yourself the bare minimum to do on that day and make it up another day. 

4. Timing

Block up your time periods whatever way suits you. I personally like to study big blocks of work at a time and since I know that’s what works for me, that’s what I do. If you’re more of a 20 minute studier, block your time into 20 minute increments. Don’t follow generic advice about setting aside an hour for each subject if that’s not how you work. 

5. Breaks

I personally, don’t like pencilling in breaks. If I’m tired, then I’m tired and I need to step back and I again, I don’t like being restricted to when I rest for a bit or not. I’ve blocked out my breaks before, and I remember stopping fifteen minutes before my study time was over because ” my break was in 15 minutes anyway.” If it helps you feel motivated and gives you something to work too, that’s fine, but I really recommend that you don’t set aside specific breaks because you’ll only end up finishing early and forcing yourself to study, as opposed to actually wanting to. If you’re forcing yourself to study, none of the information is going to really stick. 

6. Break it up

Mentioned this before, but breaking it up is really important. I know that my 9 hour Saturday study session seems ridiculous, but a 4 hour study session is about normal for me, so I break the 9hrs into two sessions. I do 4 hours before lunch, 4 hours after lunch, take a good few hours of break and then do the last hour just before bed. You’ll actually get everything done, but you won’t feel chained to your desk all the time. 

So these are my tips for keeping a study schedule. I hope I helped!

(via kyoiku)

lesson organization

Hi, all 800+ of you!

Thank you for following. I appreciate it. I apologize for not posting as much as I used to. I’ve been busy trying to balance everything and get into the swing of things. School, social life, health, and other side projects I have in mind. If you would like some updates on what’s been going on in my life, go to Sammy Accountability. Check it out, don’t check it out. It’s up to you.

Pardon me for not posting enough original content. I have increments of time in between things, but it’s just the problem of it being the first week of school and everybody wants to socialize before work gets serious. I figured since I won’t have much of a social life (try to, at least) for the rest of the year, might as well just go out and have fun.

I’m not perfect. I never claimed to be; neither have I ever claimed to know all of the answers. I’m going through life just like you, you, and you. Just because I have a study blog, it doesn’t mean I study 16 hours a day and sleep the rest. Some people want that kind of role model to be inspired but that’s simply not healthy for the mind or body.

On a more positive note, balance and moderation are key. Try your best and stay healthy.

- Sammy

Miscellaneous

hellostudying:

Hello lovely people out there:)!

Today I decided to take my camera out and to make a post about the things I usually take with me in my Backpack for School:

1. Organisation:

As you can see I’m using two kind of Notebooks/Planer for School.

The Blue one is my Homework and Class Tests Notebook and the Black one is something I’m working with for the first time this year. I plan it to be my „what to study when and how” Planner :) 

2. Pencil case

My Pencil case is just a clear cosmetic bag from H&M with some birds on ( looking for a complete clear one ).

In it I have: Highlighters, Lip balm, some sticky notes, stabilos and my pen to write with ( Black and Pink from Schneider Germany )

3. Folder

I’m not sure if this is common in different countries but I’m used to using one big folder for all my class.

My Folder is just a normal one you can Probably by everywhere ( this one is from Leitz ) its yellow, in it I always have a Notebook ( squared ) and those papers to separate each class :)

4. Flashcards

This is another thing I’m trying out this year for the first time : Studying with Flashcards.

I’m taking a bunch of them with me and with them I bought a little folder I can put them in and a clipboard I can write on ( in the bus or the train ).

5. Essentials

I guess that most of them are in everyones Back pack : A Headband for the cold days ( Primark) my purse is from Bershka and super ugly but it was on sale (!!), Umbrella is from H&M, Headphones are from Apple and my deodorant is from Dove !:) ( my phone is a part of that but it wasn’t next to me when taking the pictures ups)

6. Classes

This just includes the textbooks and essentials I need for my classes that day :)

7. Food and Drinks

I’m always taking a water bottle or tea with me for school ( probably the most important for me stay hydrated !!)

And a little snack like an apple or a banana :)

8. Backpack

This beautiful backpack is from American Apparel in the color : White/Navy :) 

___________________________________________________________________

I hope you enjoyed this post about me and my back pack :)

Good Luck for this School/College Year to everyone :)X

( Message me incase you want to know something I didn’t mentioned here)

(via successobsessed)

study life backpack

<p>A co-worker closed the door to the staff room behind him.<br/>It locked automatically<br/>and I started planning what I could use as a weapon:<br/>smash the glass beside the fridge into his...

This is tragic but true on a lot of levels. The point is well conveyed. Let me speak of my own experiences:

(Side note: The reason why I say “males” rather than “men” is because the word “men” is controversial in itself. The topic isn’t the debate on the connotative meaning on the word “man.”  The topic is about the issue females have as human beings.)

At the age of twelve, I’d been catcalled once and whistled at once. Both incidences were of males who are at least fifty years old.

At the age of thirteen, I had been used to and even expected being catcalled.

At the age of fourteen, males my age expected me to hand over my body and pressured me constantly as if it was the right and most honorable thing to do. When I’d been at my most vulnerable state (of which I won’t disclose), a male took advantage of my depressive loneliness by telling me sweet words and terrifying threats hoping he could take more than I would allow.

At fifteen, I made the mistake of letting a lot of them through my personal boundaries for the sake of being accepted and “loved.”

At sixteen, I made an even bigger mistake (of which I won’t disclose) which led me spiraling down into massive loneliness, depression, and insecurity. This mistake essentially ruined my entire being.

At the age of seventeen, raped.

Eighteen, raped. Word gets around. Slut. Whore. Skank.

Nineteen, torn but I can’t stop. I even give myself to those who treat me like I’m human. As if I am. Because I don’t feel like I am.

Twenty: At this age, I’ve been so damaged that I think that all of these events were my fault. I still do. I don’t even know what it means for my body to have value.

"Not all men are like That, but god, it’s enough." - theappleppielifestyle

It just so happens that I surrounded myself with males who “are like That.”

Ladies and gentlemen, learn from my mistakes and listen to me when I say this: Know what respect means and guard it with your life.

miscellaneous studybuddyspo theappleppielifestyle rape culture not studyspo

Sammy's Accountability

Hey guys! I was wondering if you were interested in an all-around accountability blog where I post my progress on food, fitness, reading, writing, school, and etc.

I made a new blog called SammyAccountability, where I initially wanted to focus on fitness and food. Upon writing my introduction, I had the idea of making SammyAccountability into an accountability blog for everything.

Let me know if a reply, reblog, or like

Thank you!

~ Sam